Skip to Content

Happiness at the Office- PART II

Written on January 11, 2017 at 10:10 am, by

 

In PART I, we  looked at the overall state of happiness in the workplace. Now, we look at the ways in which to exploit your capacity for happiness…

 

———————————————————————————————

 

Sonja Lyubomirsky, Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Riverside, (The How of Happiness) indicates that 50% of individual differences in happiness are governed by genes, 10 percent by life circumstances. This leaves a startling, and startlingly underdeveloped, 40% of our capacity for happiness within our power to change.

 

 

She explores 12 ways to exploit that 40 percent:

 

  1. Counting your blessings: Expressing gratitude for what you have (either privately – through contemplation or journaling – or to a close other) or conveying your appreciation to one or more individuals whom you’ve never properly thanked.
  2. Cultivating optimism: Keeping a journal in which you imagine and write about the best possible future for yourself, or practicing to look at the bright side of every situation.
  3. Avoiding overthinking and social comparison: Using strategies (such as distraction) to cut down on how often you dwell on your problems and compare yourself to others.
  4. Practicing acts of kindness: Doing good things for others, whether friends or strangers, either directly or anonymously, either spontaneously or planned.
  5. Nurturing relationships: Picking a relationship in need of strengthening, and investing time and energy in healing, cultivating, affirming, and enjoying it.
  6. Doing more activities that truly engage you: Increasing the number of experiences at home and work in which you “lose” yourself, which are challenging and absorbing.
  7. Replaying and savoring life’s joys: Paying close attention, taking delight, and going over life’s momentary pleasures and wonders – through thinking, writing, drawing, or sharing with another.
  8. Committing to your goals: Picking one, two, or three significant goals that are meaningful to you and devoting time and effort to pursuing them.
  9. Developing strategies for coping: Practicing ways to endure or surmount a recent stress, hardship, or trauma.
  10. Learning to forgive: Keeping a journal or writing a letter in which you work on letting go of anger and resentment towards one or more individuals who have hurt or wronged you.
  11. Practicing religion and spirituality: Becoming more involved in your church, temple, or mosque, or reading and pondering spiritually-themed books.
  12. Taking care of your body: Engaging in physical activity, meditating, and smiling and laughing.

 

 

Based on this strategy list, the ClearOne Spain office has implemented a happiness strategy, what we call the “Thanks Portal.”

 

 

Stay tuned for more exploration on the ongoing uses of the “Thanks Portal” and the value of employee recognition.

 

 

 

Happiness at the office – PART I

Written on December 16, 2016 at 11:58 am, by

 

Here at ClearOne, we strive for an environment that supports happy employees in a team atmosphere…the way we come together to produce exceptional products. Our Spain office has taken some great steps implementing fun concepts to further this goal that we’d like to share with you in this multi-part series.

 

The “happiness at work” concept is not new. If someone searches Google for “happiness at work,” there are at least one-hundred thousand references. So, this topic has been analyzed in detail, the main hurdle is actually applying it. The main problem is the association between happiness and the meaning of work.

 

Many people change from one job to another, looking for happiness as the “right” work and the “right” company. But it is an incorrect assumption to assume 100% of the motivation should be the company’s responsibility. It’s also incorrect to assume that a corporation can set their employee roles exactly as projects and tasks are fluid and change based on needs.

 
In general, with the current economic situation, where human forces and constant movements are not required, corporations need innovation and creativity. This is achieved with motivated and optimistic employees.

 
Luis Rojas Marcos, a professor of Psychiatry, said that one major factor of happiness is the work itself. Some people consider that work can identify them as an individual socially. It does not matter if an employee is a director or a cleaning person. If one agrees with what he/she does, devotes effort, values what the job means, and has money to do whatever he/she wants without sacrificing, happiness is achieved. A happy worker is profitable both intrinsically, and for the company.

 

Sonja Lyubomirsky, Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Riverside, (The How of Happiness ) indicates that 50% of individual differences in happiness are governed by genes and 10 percent by life circumstances. This leaves a startling, and underdeveloped 40% of our capacity for happiness within our power to change.

 

TUNE IN FOR PART II, in which we’ll talk about the 12 ways to exploit your 40% capacity for happiness!